Fall Press Day Results

 

IMG_4965For the fifth consecutive year, the CHS Legatus was named Division Three Yearbook of The Year at IUS’ Fall Press Day.

Over 400 student journalists attended the annual event held at Indiana University Southeast sponsored by the Department of Journalism. Student journalists from Southern Indiana and the Louisville Metro area listened to a moving keynote address from Extol Magazine founder and editor Angie Fenton. Fenton spoke about making people feel like they matter. After they keynote, several learning sessions were offered covering writing, design, photography and advertising. Two Fall Press Day scholarships are awarded to high journalists who intend to attend IUS in the Fall. Senior Selena Wolf was one of the two winners.

“Winning this scholarship made me realize that my dreams could come true and with this scholarship I am little bit closer to doing that. It made me feel like I am picking the right path in life,” Wolf said.

The day ended with the yearly yearbook, newspaper and online media awards. The Generals’ Delivery won Third Place Division Two Newspaper of The Year and the following individual awards:

First place: Best Feature Story–2017 graduate Emma Hedrick, Best Sports Photo –Analise DeKorte, Best Staff Editorial–Generals’ Delivery Staff

Second place: Best Overall Website–GD Online

Third Place: Best Social Media, Best Review–2017 graduate Hannah Morris, Best Overall Design

In addition to winning Yearbook of the Year, the 2017 Legatus placed first or second in the following individual categories:

First place: Cover, Sports, Photography, Student Life, Design, Copy and People Pages

Second place: Opening Section, Theme and Divisional Pages, Academics, Clubs & Organizations and Advertising

IHSPA Convention Results

IHSPA 2017

The Generals’ Delivery staff won six awards this afternoon at the Indiana High School Press Association annual convention.

Second Place Newspaper Civic Journalism: Destiny Robinson, Tabatha Schwartz and Dashia Dexter (December 2016 center spread about giving back during the holidays)

Second Place Newspaper Design: Bethany Johnson, Hannah Morris, Selena Wolf (September 2016 sports page)

Third Place Newspaper Cartoon: Samantha Smitley (September 2016 Editorial Cartoon about CCR changes)

Honorable Mention Newspaper Editorial: Emma Hedrick

Honorable Mention Newspaper Column: Hannah Morris

Honorable Mention Best Overall Social Media Presence: Generals’ Delivery Staff

Backpack rules not as controversial now

Safety and hygiene became a serious concern in the classroom for teachers and administrators following last school year. In order to help solve some of these concerns, new rules were implemented, keeping all bags and backpacks out of the classroom. Administrators believe keeping backpacks out of the classroom eliminates the temptation to have items that are not allowed in school, in class.

These rules were also implemented, to essentially make students use their lockers during passing period. Assistant Principal Timothy Sopko said, “The biggest influence for me was seeing at the end of last year how many students went through each day for the entire school year without ever visiting their lockers.  That meant they were carrying 40 to 60 pounds on their backs everyday.” While the concern for students health is appropriate, this can cause an inconvenience for students who have classes on opposite ends of the school.

Some students may experience trouble making it to class on time now that they must stop at their locker between class. Sophomore Daniel Horton said,  “The backpack rule doesn’t make any sense. It’s an inconvenience because I can’t carry my stuff for all my classes in my arms.” This shows students have trouble getting to some classes on time if they must make a stop at their locker.

While some students are struggling to get to class on time because of the new rules that have been imposed on them, some staff members who don’t have to deal with them, refuse to acknowledge the rules as an inconvenience. Front office receptionist Jinx Main said, “I don’t think there is any inconvenience. I think the rules are a great idea.”

Some students may also experience their own personal struggles due to the bag rules, that are unrelated to books and other items specifically for class. Many female students carry feminine products in their bags, which are no longer allowed in the classroom.

Along with the new bag items, administrators also implemented a new rule that only allows students to use two hall passes a day, before disciplinary action is taken. If a student has to use the restroom more than twice in one school day, they must serve a thirty minute detention.

The backpack rules were implemented for the safety of students and teachers, and although it may be an inconvenience for students, administrators believe this is the best possible solution. Antonio Grubbs said, “We don’t have to worry about students bringing things to class that could potentially hurt yourself or others. It’s not outside of the realm of possibility for someone to bring a knife or worse to class and that’s scary. We are trying to make this the best possible environment for students to learn and flourish.”

Students are beginning to adjust to the rules, and are finding ways to get to class on time without their backpacks. Senior Shane Isgrigg said, “I have adjusted to the backpack rules, and I don’t have any trouble getting to class. I still don’t like the rules, and would rather carry my backpack than stop at my locker after every class.”

Without backpacks in the classroom, teachers and administrators are confident there is a more efficient and safer learning environment. While some students may understand the backpack rules can lead to a safer environment, other students refuse to acknowledge the benefits of the rules. Senior Taylor Roederer said, “There are no positive impacts of the bag rules.”

Although some students are adjusting to the rules, other students are still very frustrated with them. This frustration could be stemming from the amount of tardies they may be receiving due to using their lockers after every class. Sopko has arranged to meet with students who have had an abundance of tardies, to work on making more strategic transitions between classes. This could be a possible solution for students who are willing to meet with him and make the proper adjustments. However, the issue of visiting a locker and using the restroom between classes can not be solved this way.

Students have a total of four minutes from the time the class dismissal bell rings, until the time the tardy bell rings. For most students this is not ample time to visit their lockers and the restroom. The use of backpacks could make this more possible, by eliminating the trip to their locker.

Sophomore Donielle Coulter started a petition to have the bag rules changed. Her goal was to reach 1,000 signatures which was not met. Students that would like to see the rules change as well are likely out of luck. Sopko said, “I don’t see that as a possibility.  All of the schools in Greater Clark and West Clark County districts have adopted similar policies and they are making a positive difference.”

Administrators are happy with the rules, and they are here to say. Students are still adjusting to the rules, and in the future it isn’t likely they will even be a topic of discussion. Until then, students will just have to deal with them because regardless of personal opinion, those are the rules.

Homecoming Prep and Pep

photos by Analise DeKorte

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Devyn Weathers, Analise DeKorte and Caitlyn Wright

Homecoming week kicked off Monday, Sept. 11 with cowboy day and ended with Friday’s class colors day. The traditional pep rally planned by Student Council was moved outside for the first time to incorporate some new games into the mix.

 

 

Ladies and gentlemen start your engines

Photos by Analise DeKorte and Caitlyn Wright

Homecoming is a night of tradition. It’s all about football, royalty and Corvettes. Thanks to the Louisville Corvette Club, the homecoming candidates made their entrance in style. Although the Generals didn’t come away with the win, seniors Murphy McEwen and Selena Wolf were named 2017 Homecoming King and Queen.